23 August 2012

German solar inverter manufacturer KACO establishes service & support centre in Milton Keynes, UK

23 August 2012 - German solar inverter manufacturer KACO new energy has established a new service and customer support centre in Milton Keynes near London. The British team lead by David Hawkins offers clients and trade partners timely and direct service at the new, centrally located support centre.

Through the establishment in Great Britain, KACO new energy now support their partners on location, and British end consumers profit from local service with competent contact partners. The branch includes a fully equipped warehouse, guaranteeing quick reaction times in service and after-sales support for partnering companies. It lies in the vicinity of various airports, and numerous British solar companies in the immediate neighbourhood offer excellent networking possibilities. 

With this new location, the German inverter manufacturer is establishing its presence in a further European PV market. After a somewhat turbulent start, the British market is now on a good path for KACO new energy, and the company is expecting a continuous rise in installation numbers in the coming years. The Powador TL3 series devices are in high demand, especially in the rising market segment of small commercial projects 

KACO new energy is one of the world’s largest manufacturers of grid-tie inverters for feeding solar energy. KACO offers a comprehensive range of inverters for PV systems for everything from single-family homes to multi-megawatt solar farms. Based in Neckarsulm, Germany, the company has been producing inverters with a cumulative capacity of more than five gigawatts since 1999. KACO new energy was the first company in the photovoltaic industry to produce their inverters (the Powador model) in a completely CO2-neutral way. Besides grid-tie and battery-based solar inverters, the company also supplies inverters for combined heat and power plants and concentrator modules as well as energy storage systems for solar power plants. 

Source: KACO